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STEM progress and the future of STEM teacher education

President Barack Obama greets a Girl Scout troup from Tulsa, Oklahoma, as he viewed their science exhibit during the 2015 White House Science Fair celebrating student winners of a broad range of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) competitions, March 23, 2015. The girls used Lego pieces and designed a battery-powered page turner to help people who are paralyzed or have arthritis. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama greets a Girl Scout troop from Tulsa, Oklahoma, as he viewed their science exhibit during the 2015 White House Science Fair celebrating student winners of a broad range of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) competitions, March 23, 2015. The girls used Lego pieces and designed a battery-powered page turner to help people who are paralyzed or have arthritis. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

After touring the White House Science Fair and meeting a team of 6-year-old robot-building supergirls, President Obama announced a new initiative for improving STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education.

Tech News World dove a little deeper into the announcement, taking a look at the recent progress being made in STEM and where it is headed in the future. In the article, Woodrow Wilson’s Director of Media and Strategy Patrick Riccards spoke on the importance of preparing teachers to teach STEM:

“Slowly, though, we are seeing a transformation in public education. This has been particularly true in the ways we prepare children with the science, technology, engineering, and math skills they will need to be college and career ready,” he pointed out.

If we truly see STEM as our future, the focus must be on developing a generation of excellent STEM educators for our schools — particularly our high-need schools, Riccards urged.

All the love in the world for STEM is meaningless, he said, if schools are staffed by ineffective teachers who are not truly versed in the STEM disciplines.

See the full article here.


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